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nearlya:

Alexi K - Artist

"Call me slow, but I’ve just found out that my art - especially the drawings - is posted all over the place on the internet - sometimes not by me. If you’ve featured me, and credited my name, thank you, I really appreciate the support. X

If you’ve featured me, but didn’t credit the art, please make the effort, it’s only polite. ;)”  from his website

(via fuck3ry)

Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink 

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

Let’s take it a step further. For every hour a white man works, a black woman has to work 86 minutes to earn as much money. 57.6 hours a week compared to the white man’s 40.

Take it another step further. Assuming a Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 job, from Thursday 12:45pm through Friday end of business, a white man gets paid for his work, a black woman is, by comparison, working for free.

(via quentintortellini)

THE LAST LINE

(via covenesque)

This. I am tired of seing this numbers without thinking about woc. (via arobynsong)

(Source: fliponymous, via lifeofseasonx)

quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Piri Thomas!
Piri Thomas (September 30, 1928 – October 17, 2011) was a writer and poet whose memoir Down These Mean Streets became a best-seller.
Thomas (birth name: Juan Pedro Tomas) was born to a Puerto Rican mother and Cuban father. His childhood neighborhood in the Spanish Harlem section of New York City was riddled with crime and violence. According to Thomas, children were expected to be gang members at a young age, and Thomas was no exception. Thomas was also exposed to racial discrimination because of the color of his skin and because he was Hispanic. He was always referred to as Black despite his Puerto Rican heritage because of his skin color (Down These Mean Streets).
Thomas was involved with drugs, gang warfare and crime. While spending six years in prison, Thomas reflected on the teachings of his mother and father, and realized that a person is not born a criminal. Consequently he decided to use his street and prison know-how to reach at-risk youth, and to help them avoid a life of crime.
In 1967, Thomas received funds from the Rabinowitz Foundation to write and publish his best-selling autobiography Down These Mean Streets. The book describes his struggle for survival as a Puerto Rican/Cuban born and raised in the barrios of New York. It has been in print for 45 years. His other works include Savior, Savior Hold My Hand; Seven Long Times; and Stories from El Barrio.
Thomas was influential in the Nuyorican Movement which included poets Pedro Pietri, Miguel Algarin, and Giannina Braschi, who wrote of life in New York City using a mix of English and Spanish. Thomas worked on a book titled A Matter of Dignity and on an educational film entitled Dialogue with Society.
Thomas traveled around the U.S., Central America and Europe, giving lectures and conducting workshops in colleges and universities. He was the subject of the film Every Child is Born a Poet: The Life and Work of Piri Thomas, by Jonathan Robinson, which featured a soundtrack by Kip Hanrahan.
On October 17, 2011, Thomas died from pneumonia at his home in El Cerrito, California. He is survived by his wife Suzie Dod Thomas, six children, and three stepchildren.

quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Piri Thomas!

Piri Thomas (September 30, 1928 – October 17, 2011) was a writer and poet whose memoir Down These Mean Streets became a best-seller.

Thomas (birth name: Juan Pedro Tomas) was born to a Puerto Rican mother and Cuban father. His childhood neighborhood in the Spanish Harlem section of New York City was riddled with crime and violence. According to Thomas, children were expected to be gang members at a young age, and Thomas was no exception. Thomas was also exposed to racial discrimination because of the color of his skin and because he was Hispanic. He was always referred to as Black despite his Puerto Rican heritage because of his skin color (Down These Mean Streets).

Thomas was involved with drugs, gang warfare and crime. While spending six years in prison, Thomas reflected on the teachings of his mother and father, and realized that a person is not born a criminal. Consequently he decided to use his street and prison know-how to reach at-risk youth, and to help them avoid a life of crime.

In 1967, Thomas received funds from the Rabinowitz Foundation to write and publish his best-selling autobiography Down These Mean Streets. The book describes his struggle for survival as a Puerto Rican/Cuban born and raised in the barrios of New York. It has been in print for 45 years. His other works include Savior, Savior Hold My Hand; Seven Long Times; and Stories from El Barrio.

Thomas was influential in the Nuyorican Movement which included poets Pedro Pietri, Miguel Algarin, and Giannina Braschi, who wrote of life in New York City using a mix of English and Spanish. Thomas worked on a book titled A Matter of Dignity and on an educational film entitled Dialogue with Society.

Thomas traveled around the U.S., Central America and Europe, giving lectures and conducting workshops in colleges and universities. He was the subject of the film Every Child is Born a Poet: The Life and Work of Piri Thomas, by Jonathan Robinson, which featured a soundtrack by Kip Hanrahan.

On October 17, 2011, Thomas died from pneumonia at his home in El Cerrito, California. He is survived by his wife Suzie Dod Thomas, six children, and three stepchildren.

(via lifeofseasonx)

What do you most value in your friends?
Their continued existence.
– Christopher Hitchens (via observando)

(via mynamesdiana)

nearlya:

Alexi K - Artist

"Call me slow, but I’ve just found out that my art - especially the drawings - is posted all over the place on the internet - sometimes not by me. If you’ve featured me, and credited my name, thank you, I really appreciate the support. X

If you’ve featured me, but didn’t credit the art, please make the effort, it’s only polite. ;)”  from his website

(via fuck3ry)

Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink 

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

Let’s take it a step further. For every hour a white man works, a black woman has to work 86 minutes to earn as much money. 57.6 hours a week compared to the white man’s 40.

Take it another step further. Assuming a Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 job, from Thursday 12:45pm through Friday end of business, a white man gets paid for his work, a black woman is, by comparison, working for free.

(via quentintortellini)

THE LAST LINE

(via covenesque)

This. I am tired of seing this numbers without thinking about woc. (via arobynsong)

(Source: fliponymous, via lifeofseasonx)

(Source: ecstasymodels, via floralistic)

(Source: s-ensitivus, via 2ampondering)

(Source: aubrian, via spookyshells)

quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Piri Thomas!
Piri Thomas (September 30, 1928 – October 17, 2011) was a writer and poet whose memoir Down These Mean Streets became a best-seller.
Thomas (birth name: Juan Pedro Tomas) was born to a Puerto Rican mother and Cuban father. His childhood neighborhood in the Spanish Harlem section of New York City was riddled with crime and violence. According to Thomas, children were expected to be gang members at a young age, and Thomas was no exception. Thomas was also exposed to racial discrimination because of the color of his skin and because he was Hispanic. He was always referred to as Black despite his Puerto Rican heritage because of his skin color (Down These Mean Streets).
Thomas was involved with drugs, gang warfare and crime. While spending six years in prison, Thomas reflected on the teachings of his mother and father, and realized that a person is not born a criminal. Consequently he decided to use his street and prison know-how to reach at-risk youth, and to help them avoid a life of crime.
In 1967, Thomas received funds from the Rabinowitz Foundation to write and publish his best-selling autobiography Down These Mean Streets. The book describes his struggle for survival as a Puerto Rican/Cuban born and raised in the barrios of New York. It has been in print for 45 years. His other works include Savior, Savior Hold My Hand; Seven Long Times; and Stories from El Barrio.
Thomas was influential in the Nuyorican Movement which included poets Pedro Pietri, Miguel Algarin, and Giannina Braschi, who wrote of life in New York City using a mix of English and Spanish. Thomas worked on a book titled A Matter of Dignity and on an educational film entitled Dialogue with Society.
Thomas traveled around the U.S., Central America and Europe, giving lectures and conducting workshops in colleges and universities. He was the subject of the film Every Child is Born a Poet: The Life and Work of Piri Thomas, by Jonathan Robinson, which featured a soundtrack by Kip Hanrahan.
On October 17, 2011, Thomas died from pneumonia at his home in El Cerrito, California. He is survived by his wife Suzie Dod Thomas, six children, and three stepchildren.

quisqueyameetsborinken:

Happy birthday, Piri Thomas!

Piri Thomas (September 30, 1928 – October 17, 2011) was a writer and poet whose memoir Down These Mean Streets became a best-seller.

Thomas (birth name: Juan Pedro Tomas) was born to a Puerto Rican mother and Cuban father. His childhood neighborhood in the Spanish Harlem section of New York City was riddled with crime and violence. According to Thomas, children were expected to be gang members at a young age, and Thomas was no exception. Thomas was also exposed to racial discrimination because of the color of his skin and because he was Hispanic. He was always referred to as Black despite his Puerto Rican heritage because of his skin color (Down These Mean Streets).

Thomas was involved with drugs, gang warfare and crime. While spending six years in prison, Thomas reflected on the teachings of his mother and father, and realized that a person is not born a criminal. Consequently he decided to use his street and prison know-how to reach at-risk youth, and to help them avoid a life of crime.

In 1967, Thomas received funds from the Rabinowitz Foundation to write and publish his best-selling autobiography Down These Mean Streets. The book describes his struggle for survival as a Puerto Rican/Cuban born and raised in the barrios of New York. It has been in print for 45 years. His other works include Savior, Savior Hold My Hand; Seven Long Times; and Stories from El Barrio.

Thomas was influential in the Nuyorican Movement which included poets Pedro Pietri, Miguel Algarin, and Giannina Braschi, who wrote of life in New York City using a mix of English and Spanish. Thomas worked on a book titled A Matter of Dignity and on an educational film entitled Dialogue with Society.

Thomas traveled around the U.S., Central America and Europe, giving lectures and conducting workshops in colleges and universities. He was the subject of the film Every Child is Born a Poet: The Life and Work of Piri Thomas, by Jonathan Robinson, which featured a soundtrack by Kip Hanrahan.

On October 17, 2011, Thomas died from pneumonia at his home in El Cerrito, California. He is survived by his wife Suzie Dod Thomas, six children, and three stepchildren.

(via lifeofseasonx)

(Source: szshap, via floralistic)

(Source: shopdixi, via cherrywhore)

(Source: thelifeoflsb, via dymetaylor)

(Source: lunebrille, via irrelevantt)

What do you most value in your friends?
Their continued existence.
– Christopher Hitchens (via observando)

(via mynamesdiana)

"Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …"
"What do you most value in your friends?
Their continued existence."

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